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BUYING MAGNETIC BRACELETS

Questions like Which is the best magnetic bracelets to buy would really mean From who to buy.

There are many webstores that offer the best magnetic bracelets. They bombard you with images, messages, and promises. Each will be the best, the bigger, and…well…the best. One needs to be with a clear head when one approach this matter. The fact is the reputable online stores like Argos, Boots, Superdrug and Holland and Barrett simply do not carry the range. So you are down to specialists. Like us.

There is one thing, one that triumph above all, when we look at a site from a person or a company that we do not know: CAN YOU TRUST THIS SITE?

Trust is a complicated issue. When we stand in front of a person, there are so many things that formulate our opinion and determine if we trust that person: The person show compassion and humility, he is consistent, the person is clearly respect my boundaries, the person looks relax, display respect, and most of all, it is apparent that he or she is right a lot of the time.

Many of the above cannot be transferred to the internet. As we do not have body gestures, we need to investigate this one: Are they right a lot? That will help establish trust in a website.

Here is a list that will help in establishing trust:

1. CUSTOMER REVIEWS:

Favourite way to buy you in is having slivers of customer feedback on the first page. Those will be always having quotation marks wrapping the feedback. The intension is to plant the seed of authority in your mind – so you will think that they are real. But they may not be.

But this practice should raise the alarm bells in your head: After all, the website’s operator has complete control on our website – and what stops them having a moment of creative writing and simply invent them?  Nothing at all. Do not trust quoted feedbacks on the home page.

There is a solution for this trust issue: If the sites that you are looking at are using a third-party reviews site, you can trust them. Such sites allow buyers to post a review that the website owners cannot edit.

2. ABOUT US PAGE:

In shady sites, this page is full of self praises, compliments, and a lot of…well…nothingness. Let me give few examples:

“Here at …. Our aim is to support people in…”
A lot of woeful rhetoric.

“We pride ourselves on offering an excellent service. It is one you can trust, as seen from a few testimonials below: “Excellent service, had to send my bracelet back for a size exchange, customer service courteous and efficient, I would definitely recommend them”
Really, is there any seller out there that would say otherwise, like lets say, we do not pride…you see where it is going to. Also, whatever was said about customer’s feedback in quotations in the front page is good for any page.

“From the beginning, our company ethos has been to provide the best magnetic…”
I should think so – however, everybody else who do not uses this sentence on their About Me page means that they aim to provide the worse products?

3. WE ARE THE BIGGEST:

Oh yes, and the list of variations for this claim for fame goes on:

“The Largest Shop in the UK”.

“The largest provider in the UK”.

It is actually extremely easy to fact check this claim: Just go to the categories or all products, see how many items are available, make a note and move to another site. If you come across a site that has more products, you have managed to catch them on a lie. And presto, they are not telling the truth.

4. LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION:

We are based in the UK. That means that we can provide fast turnaround of fulfilling orders, are here on the other side of the phone to answer questions, and most of all, can resolve issues fast.  A Chinese website may send your order immediately, but it will still take 5 to 9 weeks to arrive, and will not be able, and most likely will not be willing to solve a problem, it is just too costly because of the distance and the cost structure that they operate to.

5. RELIABILITY:

A website selling merchandise from the kitchen table after the owner finished a shift at this or that workplace – is not the kind of a seller that you want to place your health and hard earnt money in their hands. To resolve this, look for a business address (check that this is not a house at Google Maps), and that they have a phone. A free number will indicate if they actually interested to have calls from you. Just a thought.

6. RETURN POLICY:

Will they accept returns easily, and what happens to unwanted gifts? Find out and compare between sites.

7. GUARANTEE:

While the law provides protection for online buyers, a seller that excels and offer more is a seller that trust their own product’s quality.

7. AFTER SALE SERVICE:

You need to find out what the webstore says about the after-sale service. While magnetic bracelets are not cars, and do not need MOT and yearly service, there may things that you will need: Do the seller offer to resize your bracelet if it too short, how easy it is to exchange the item if it is too big, is there a guarantee, and what do you do if you purchased a gift, and it is not wanted.

8. (SIMPLY) STUPID CLAIMS:

We have seen with our own eyes a seller who claim that they invented a whole new physics science. You can find sites that claim the magnets they use in the bracelets are special magnets they invented, that the magnets have special magnetic properties, and one seller even provides as a selling point special ‘recharging’ case. Topping it, one claim that their magnetic bracelets are medical devices.

So here it is:

There are no special magnets, the patents are “Design Patents” at best, which are a type of industrial design right. So the bracelet’s design is protected, the magnets are not invented.

There is no such thing as ‘recharging cases’: Permanent magnets cannot be recharge at home. Permanent magnets are created in industrial settings where certain metals are magnetised by big mega machines. Permanent magnets are not batteries and cannot be charged. And by the way, they lose less than 1% per year from their strength, so it will take you about 20 years before you may notice significant loss of magnetism.

Magnetic bracelets ARE NOT Medical Device Class I. Class I medical device means that register certain devices such as hospital beds in the government website. This registration is a self-registration by the supplier and do not means that the device passed any tests or approved to aid recovery from any medical condition more than a hospital bed will help in recovery.

Who are you going to trust?

Trust www.magnetic-therapy-bracelets.com